Publications

Below are the abstracts of some of the publications by Dr. Rupal Shah

Techniques in Ophthalmology

March 2010 – Volume 8 – Issue 1 – pp 35-42

All-in-One Femtosecond Laser Refractive Surgery

Shah, Rupal MS*; Shah, Samir MTech, MS*; Vogelsang, Hartmut†

 

Abstract

Purpose: To describe techniques (FLEx and SMILE) for performing all-in-one Femtosecond Laser Refractive Surgery, without using an excimer laser.

Methods: The VisuMax femtosecond laser is used to carve out a refractive lenticule from within the corneal stroma, and then the lenticule is physically removed, either by creating and lifting a flap of the cornea, or by extracting it from a small incision.

Results: The technique gives results which are stable, effective, safe and predictable.

Conclusions: All-In-One Femtosecond Laser Refractive Surgery is a new technique of performing corneal laser refractive surgery. It has clinical, practical and economic benefits over a traditional two-laser solution.

Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery

Citation: Volume 37, Issue 1, Pages 127-137 (January 2011)

Results of Small Incision Lenticule Extraction: All-in-one Femtosecond Laser Refractive Surgery

Authors: Rupal Shah, Samir Shah, Sayantan Sengupta

Abstract

Purpose
To report the clinical results of small incision lenticule extraction to correct refractive errors using a femtosecond laser to refine the femtosecond lenticule extraction technique.

Setting
Private laser center, Vadodara, India.

Design
Prospective clinical study.

Methods
The VisuMax femtosecond laser system was used to perform small incision lenticule extraction to treat refractive errors. The laser was used to cut a refractive lenticule intrastromally to correct myopia and myopic astigmatism. The lenticule was then extracted from the stroma through a 3.0 to 5.0 mm incision. Outcome measures were corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), and manifest refraction during 6 months of follow-up. Corneal topography and ocular wavefront aberrations were also measured.

Results
The study enrolled 51 eyes of 41 patients. The mean spherical equivalent was −4.87 diopters (D) ± 2.16 (SD) preoperatively and +0.03 ± 0.30 D 6 months postoperatively. Refractive stability was achieved within 1 month (P<.01). Six months after surgery, 79% of all full-correction cases had a UDVA of 20/25 or better. The 6-month postoperative CDVA was the same as or better than the preoperative CDVA in 95% of eyes. Two eyes lost 1 line of CDVA.

Conclusion
All-in-one femtosecond refractive correction using a small incision technique was safe, predictable, and effective in treating myopia and myopic astigmatism.

Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Effect of scanning patterns on the results of femtosecond laser lenticule extraction refractive surgery

Author: Rupal Shah, Samir Shah
Publication: Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery
Volume: 37, Issue: 9, Pages: 1636 to 1647Date: Thursday, September 01, 2011
Abstract
Purpose: To report the clinical results of refractive lenticule extraction using a femtosecond laser and describe the effect of scanning patterns on the results.
Setting: Private laser center, Vadodara, India.
Design: Prospective clinical study.
Methods: The Visumax femtosecond laser system was used to perform lenticule extraction to treat refractive errors using 2 scanning trajectories. The laser was used to cut a refractive lenticule intrastromally to correct myopia or myopic astigmatism. The lenticule was then physically extracted from the stroma. In scanning pattern A, the laser scanned from the center out and the periphery in while the 2 surfaces of the lenticule were cut. In scan pattern B, the laser scanned from the periphery in and the center out. Outcome measures were corrected and uncorrected distance visual acuities and manifest refraction during a 6-month follow-up. Differences between the 2 scanning patterns were also analyzed.
Results: The study comprised 329 eyes of 173 patients. One week postoperatively, there were statistically significant differences in refractive outcomes (P=.03), safety (P<.01), and efficacy (P<.01), between the 2 scanning-pattern groups. At 6 months, there were no significant differences.
Conclusions: Early visual recovery and refractive outcomes after femtosecond lenticule extraction were affected by the scanning trajectory of the laser. A trajectory that scanned from the periphery to the center and the center to the periphery to cut the 2 lenticule surfaces had a positive effect on visual recovery.

 

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